Today's LinkedIn Nugget

Guest Blog Post: Get in step with @CarolynSchultz’s 4 top #LinkedIn marketing ideas

Carolyn A. Schultz participates frequently in the “Ask Me Anything” LinkedIn sessions I offer to one of my networking groups. Her questions are always well thought out and show she has deep understanding of what to say to promote her “why,” so I asked her to share some of the ingredients of her special sauce here today.

 

4 Writing Strategies To Improve Your LinkedIn Success

The Top Things I’ve Learned about LinkedIn: A Marketing Writer’s Perspective

By Carolyn A. Schultz

As a marketing content writer and strategist—as well as a very active networker—here are 4 key efforts that have helped me maximize my time on LinkedIn.

Tip #1: In your profile’s about section, offer value without direct selling.

Focus on who you’re helping. Describe briefly why and how you’re awesome and different—and why that matters for your current and prospective contacts.

Don’t use the about section to try to make a sale or promise everything. The about section’s goal is to encourage people to connect with you, and then the sales and business relationships will come.

Tip #2: Write customized connection requests.

When connecting with someone new, take advantage of LinkedIn’s option to send a note with the connection request.

In your note, address them by name, and briefly indicate how you know them and why you’d like to connect. For example: Did you meet them at an online networking event with a specific group? Did someone else suggest you reach out to them? Do you already know them, and you hope to strengthen the connection through LinkedIn?

In initial communications, emphasize helping—not selling—as you work on building the relationships and getting to know your new connections.

Tip #3: Comment and support others often and strategically.

Posting your own content is beneficial—but it’s equally (if not more) beneficial to comment on others’ posts in your network.

If your contacts are celebrating milestones, sharing new offerings, and asking thoughtful questions, your comments (even if they’re brief) will help them by showing public support. Their network and your network will notice your participation, and it will increase awareness for you and your contacts.

Tip #4: Be yourself and do what works for you.

If you love face-to-face networking and email follow-up, keep it up! Then increase your LinkedIn activity to supplement your other efforts.

If you don’t love other forms of networking, LinkedIn can help you meet new people and interact with them on your own terms.

For whatever approach matches your personal style, use the capabilities of LinkedIn to share updates and support others in a central online location.

Even if you only have a little time once a day or a few times a week, LinkedIn writing and interactivity can be a key component of networking and professional success.

 

I hope these tips were helpful, and thanks to Marc for the opportunity to share them!

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As a Marketing Content Writer and Strategist for 15+ years, Carolyn A. Schultz helps businesses and nonprofits with winning proposals—as well as articles, blogs, websites, and other compelling communications content.

In 2015, Carolyn started her own business because she loves helping mission-driven organizations accomplish their goals through education and outreach—whether it’s winning a new project, reaching new audiences, or publishing new content.

You can learn more and connect with Carolyn at carolynaschultz.com and linkedin.com/in/carolyn-a-schultz-marketing.

 

 

2 thoughts on “Guest Blog Post: Get in step with @CarolynSchultz’s 4 top #LinkedIn marketing ideas”

  1. Excellent piece, Carolyn. It reinforces what Marc & Simon Sinek have been preaching about – Start With “Why” & “I”. “A chain is no stronger than its weakest link.” I look at LINKedIn as my way to connect with strong LINKS and together, create a strong chain. If just one link is weak, the chain will break. It is important to connect with strong LINKS, replace the weak ones and if I am the “weakest LINK”, I need to invest more in identifying and developing my strengths.

    1. Thanks Steve: I appreciate your kind, detailed feedback, and I’m so glad the post was helpful! Absolutely, LinkedIn is all about linking, connecting, and creating a strong chain where you can share your strengths in a way that works for you.

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