Today's LinkedIn Nugget

#EmotionalIntelligence: a series; part 8 of 13

EILinkedIn

Note: Emotional Intelligence (“EI”) is the belief that our ability to channel and control our emotions will have a direct effect on our success.  I came across an article on inc.com by my connection Justin Bariso and I wanted to add my 2 cents, from a LinkedIn currency perspective, to make this concept, as expanded upon in his great article, fit the audience here. Every day for the next 13 business days I will offer how, and where, and especially why, you should take advantage of his article’s teaching on your LinkedIn profile page. Thank you, Justin for agreeing to my offering further comments. 

Constructive feedback only, please

In our hustle and bustle, we offer our opinions, but they can be misconstrued by poor choice of wording or the lack of intonation in electronic writing. You wanted to say one thing and its meaning was misleading.

Back to the write it, let it cool concept.

If you have some criticism or you take exception to something on LinkedIn, draft your reply and stop. Come back later (in another frame of mind) and revise it to a constructive voice.

You will look better and feel better that you did. And the war of words will be mitigated and perhaps resolve into a dialog of professional observations and experience that will help others, rather than alienate them and make you look unprofessional.

Constructive, supportive, well-meaning ideas and “from my experience” advice can be a way to engage new connections and colleagues on your Home page and in Groups on LinkedIn. You do not have to have the last word.

Offer your help and answer questions in LinkedIn Groups, a great way to establish thought leadership among similarly-minded people in your Group. Ask questions there too, since we do not know everything about a topic.

In the past I have shared an article I read, and, in my comments, spoke about why I liked its content, followed by “but I would have liked to see more elaboration on {a certain topical aspect in the article}.” The author actually reached out and thanked me and mentioned the editors of the article chopped that part out. Dialog began. She became a connection after vetting and extended conversation, at my initiation.

Be professionally kind, generous, and always well-understood. 

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