Today's LinkedIn Nugget

And then what happened?

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You connect some professionals on LinkedIn. You put a lot of thought and nice comments behind it.

Sure, they thanked you at the outset.

Then you wait for them to contact each other, for sparks to ignite, and for something useful to come about.

But you don’t hear anything. Then you wonder, “was it useful to one or both?”

But they never let you know what happened. Because we get busy. Because we get distracted.

Nothing is requiring you to put the referrer on a “pedastool,” as my grandmother used to say, but do make a point of updating the introducer that the process has started, or it’s in process, or it’s meant-to-be, or as sometimes happens, it never took off.

From that information, other referrals can come, each better than the earlier one(s), with experience as a guide.

Referrals are like trains, if you miss one there’s another one coming, (and here is where the simile ends) if you act and optimize them, and update the giver.

Today's LinkedIn Nugget

Did you know these 2 things?

  • That you can research a past post you placed on LinkedIn? Suppose you want to send a post you made a month ago to a new connection to “on-board” him/her. That will show him/her how you operate, to share something that you wrote that may help. But where is it, like a snowflake in a snowstorm, everything else you posted after it covers it? Easy:
    • go to your personal profile, scroll down to Activity,
    • then at the bottom of these last 6 items you have posted,
    • click “see all activity” and
    • select the type of item you are looking for (articles, posts, or documents) or select “all activity.”
    • click the 3 dots atop the item and click “copy link to article” to add it to your clipboard and then paste it into the message you want to send.
  • That you can search for any post or other material that someone else sent

So there you go, simple steps to find something great you or someone else contributed to the global conversation called LinkedIn.

Today's LinkedIn Nugget

Back to basics Tuesday: be easy to reach

Twice (!) last week I was looking for email addresses of people I had met via zoom and assumed (and you know what that means when you assume!) they showed their email address in the “contact details” section of their personal LinkedIn profile.

In another case, his email address was listed at his former company, as in 18-months-ago-former- company.

Check yours now.

Test it by clicking it to be sure it works.

Missing? Add one.

Old one? Update it.

Don’t make it so hard to email you, or call or text or send any other smoke signal, that the person trying to get in touch with you decided it’s too difficult and–poof–that opportunity goes up in, yes, smoke!

Today's LinkedIn Nugget

It’s a combination of what and who you know

N emailed me:

Hi Marc,

I tried and tried to get contact info for {HS}, but nothing is coming forth through his website or LinkedIn account. I did send a generic email to his company, but will be surprised if someone will respond with H’s email/phone number. Might you have a suggestion on how we can track down H’s email? Here’s his LinkedIn page: https://www.linkedin.com/HS

Thanks, N

Whoosh, the sleuthing juices started to pump through the LinkedIn compartments of my brain.

First, I looked at HS’s LinkedIn profile, and no, we are not 1st level connected.

Next, I perused his contact details. No email address to be found. (OK, I get that some people don’t want to show that publicly, especially in this case, CEOs.)

Then I clicked on the company website link in the contact details. Sometimes you can ascertain the style that the company uses in its email addresses, like HS@{company}.com or herb@{company}.com for example. No one, yup, no one, had an email address on the website other than a generic contact us form.

One more step, I looked at his company profile page on LinkedIn for more clues. Another dead end.

Not to worry, I have other ideas. I love a LinkedIn challenge!

While on the company Page I searched LinkedIn for his work colleagues at his company; that hit a brick wall, with no one listing more than their Linkedin URL in their own contact details. I think they need a LinkedIn trainer…

Back to his profile. Who do I know that he also is connected to? Aha, 2 people!

I messaged both identically:

I hope you are well. I am trying to get HS’s email address for a marketing project I am working on for a gardening-inspired river boat cruise in Europe next year. All on the up-and-up I assure you. I see you are connected on LinkedIn to him. Do you have his email address? Thanks, Marc

Eureka! One responded the next morning with the sought-after email address. I responded with a hearty thank you.

The other didn’t know it but mentioned she was glad to be back in touch. 1 point for Gryffindor.

As always, should any of my LinkedIn Force be caught or killed, the Secretary will disavow any knowledge of your actions. This episode of Mission Possible featured no more intrigue than an elusive email address.

It’s always a happy ending when you try hard and know the right people.

Today's LinkedIn Nugget

It’s a combination of what and who you know

N emailed me:

Hi Marc,

I tried and tried to get contact info for {HS}, but nothing is coming forth through his website or LinkedIn account. I did send a generic email to his company, but will be surprised if someone will respond with H’s email/phone number. Might you have a suggestion on how we can track down H’s email? Here’s his LinkedIn page: https://www.linkedin.com/HS

Thanks, N

Whoosh, the sleuthing juices started to pump through the LinkedIn compartments of my brain.

First, I looked at HS’s LinkedIn profile, and no, we are not 1st level connected.

Next, I perused his contact details. No email address to be found. (OK, I get that some people don’t want to show that publicly, especially in this case, CEOs.)

Then I clicked on the company website link in the contact details. Sometimes you can ascertain the style that the company uses in its email addresses, like HS@{company}.com or herb@{company}.com for example. No one, yup, no one, had an email address on the website other than a generic contact us form.

One more step, I looked at his company profile page on LinkedIn for more clues. Another dead end.

Not to worry, I have other ideas. I love a LinkedIn challenge!

While on the company Page I searched LinkedIn for his work colleagues at his company; that hit a brick wall, with no one listing more than their Linkedin URL in their own contact details. I think they need a LinkedIn trainer…

Back to his profile. Who do I know that he also is connected to? Aha, 2 people!

I messaged both identically:

I hope you are well. I am trying to get HS’s email address for a marketing project I am working on for a gardening-inspired river boat cruise in Europe next year. All on the up-and-up I assure you. I see you are connected on LinkedIn to him. Do you have his email address? Thanks, Marc

Eureka! One responded the next morning with the sought-after email address. I responded with a hearty thank you.

The other didn’t know it but mentioned she was glad to be back in touch. 1 point for Gryffindor.

As always, should any of my LinkedIn Force be caught or killed, the Secretary will disavow any knowledge of your actions. This episode of Mission Possible featured no more intrigue than an elusive email address.

It’s always a happy ending when you try hard and know the right people.

Today's LinkedIn Nugget

It’s Friday so let’s get a little QRazy

The usher handed us a 2 1/2″ square slip of paper (that’s 60 mm for my non-US readers) at a recent play we attended. Not a usual program booklet full of ads and actor bios thanking Mom and Dad and their preferred deity for the opportunity to act.

We focused on the QR code with our smartphone cameras, and voila, a program for the play! Minimal paper wasted. A good thing.

So I started thinking of ways to revisit uses for QR codes, since they seem to be back in style. I am seeing them on signs and magazine advertisements (the last time I wrote about this was almost exactly 3 years ago, and LinkedIn users seemed underwhelmed since I rarely see these), but for the sake of instruction, here’s the “how to” from LinkedIn’s Help Center.

BTW I made these 3 on QR Creator, which allows you a few innovative options (hmmm…ideas for those new post-pandemic business cards?):

guess?
my website
me on pickmybrain.world

Let your creativity run free, like I did above. What other ideas do you see for this apparent resurgence in QR codes? Tell us.

Today's LinkedIn Nugget

I learned something (again)

My father used to tell us “learn something” as we went off to school. How corny, I remember thinking, but now as I am older, how wishful. How rich.

I strive to be relevant and increase my effectiveness in everything I do, with everyone I come across. So I am gratified to learn from my peers and colleagues in every conversation, in every interaction in words or other ways. I blush when someone went out of her way to thank me for my contribution to a group discussion, as happened last week. Gratifying: I am having the desired effect. But it not all about giving. I like to receive as well.

I learned about pechakucha from a global cadre of new friends, I was exposed to the Human Library from one of the “books” (a beautiful wise person) who is available for “borrowing,” I was engaged as never before in multiple zoom conversations with smart, giving colleagues all over the world in the past months who have increased my global knowledge in exponential ways. And finally, I have had the pleasure of presenting to a group of entrepreneurs (to be asked back to present again) and revel in the honor of having coached complex and fascinating individuals to better present their “why.”

I want to do more.

Soon you will see an animation that I am excited about, 1 of a series of 4, to make an impression on the memories of others, created by some very creative people. And I will be on NYC radio again, more podcasts are scheduled, all answering questions that always challenge me to add my value.

All about LinkedIn. I sometimes marvel at how I can expound upon this open marketing power tool.

At each turn in my journey, I learn and can reuse my new knowledge. I can contribute to others so they can catapult. It’s a continuum. It had better never end.

What have you learned today?

Thanks, Dad.

Today's LinkedIn Nugget

Roomfuls

The rooms I frequent these days are either electronic, as in Zoom breakout sessions, or physical, as in the first face-to-face networking session I attended last week.

Or in a LinkedIn Group, increasingly hard to find, or in a conversation over a LinkedIn post that I, or someone else, contributed.

My point? It’s not the electronic, or the gypsum board walls that separate spaces, but rather the cerebral and the emotional ones that combine us to be greater through collaboration. From any number of participants, brilliance. Why I named my company connect2collaborate, you guys.

It’s only those special sometimes when that brilliance is palpable, then it’s infectious.

So I will never get “zoom fatigue” when each opportunity can bring me together with one, or more, like-minded contribution-driven, sharing, nurturing, experienced colleagues. That feeling of interaction makes us all better.

I can only say it happens to me enough to be thankful, yet never enough to ever take it for granted. And I cannot get enough of it, like a fine dish prepared by a team of masters in a kitchen, also a room, combining quality ingredients together in a way that my taste buds tell my brain, “this is really special, taste the nuances slowly, and appreciate every morsel.”

Oh yeah, the LinkedIn tie-in: does your reader “taste” your quality and savor your offering? Can you improve on your recipe and share it with others to emulate and/or perhaps doctor a bit to make it even better? Can you enter their cerebral and emotional space as a unique brand to be recognized for your worth? Probably, but can you do better?

Stir that LinkedIn pot, in any room you participate in.

Today's LinkedIn Nugget

Back to basics Tuesday: 6 ways to make sure that day away keeps you in contact

Let’s say you go out on a day full of appointments (because we now can).

Or you take a day, hopefully more, off.

But how do you keep up to speed on your emails, podcasts, social media, especially LinkedIn? You download the mobile apps for each, including LinkedIn.

Is the LinkedIn mobile app as good an experience as the desktop? IMHO, no, but it’s all we get, so make the most of it.

Six pieces of mobile Linkedin app advice for today:

  1. Stay on top of your messages and notifications. Yes, they are found in different places on the mobile version than the desktop, but stay in the conversation no matter the device you use. Missing a day can mean lost opportunities, and you don’t want that, right?
  2. Be in the moment when an appointment suddenly changes and you are now destined to meet a different person. Read up on him/her on the mobile app to be ready and prepared to break the ice by showing you did your homework, even if last-minute. Weave your new knowledge about them into the conversation naturally and they will be impressed.
  3. Check the voice recording of the pronunciation of their name (hopefully they have added this) to be sure you do not stumble and seem ill-at-ease with their most cherished possession, their name. Check for a small speaker icon after their name on their profile. Click it with the smartphone speakers turned up.
  4. Be ready to shoot some raw video on your smartphone to post something that needs to be shared with your connection base immediately. Short, to the point, and add some words as comments to tell them what they are about to see–this will enhance click-throughs. And hopefully, comments.
  5. Look at their LinkedIn posts, Stories, comments, to see what they have commented on recently, what their interests are. Make that part of your conversation too.
  6. Finally, be sure you show your mobile phone number on your contact details. Not your office number. Be ready to receive mobile calls and texts, being in the moment, while on the go.

Ace the LinkedIn game even when out of the office, with every tool you have access to. It’s in your hands.