Today's LinkedIn Nugget

Top 15 resolutions to make LinkedIn work even better for you in 2015! Part 3 of 3

201511. Resolve to nurture your LinkedIn connections with new articles you come across or observations that will benefit them, encourage them to share as well. Do this as often as warranted with quality material to “blip” on their radar screen and stay top-of-mind.

12. Resolve to “like,” “comment” or “share” others’ news and congratulate each other on work anniversaries-this will grow the personal learning network we have with each other–a virtual community of nurturing businesspeople on LinkedIn.

13. Resolve read Pulse daily to stay on top of news stories you might have normally missed. Select topics and sources as you need them. Stay on top of the latest curated material especially designed to your expressed interests and needs.

14. Resolve to cull through your list of LinkedIn connections and de-connect from those you do not have an affinity for, or because you connected to them so long ago you don’t recall who they are or what they do. It’s OK-life and relationships change.

15. Resolve to reevaluate the list of LinkedIn groups you belong to, and participate actively in the ones that make most sense. Sharing with similarly-minded people is a great way to enhance your reputation though you are not connected to them directly.

In sum, resolve to present yourself  the best you can and give back the best you can, to demonstrate WHY YOU DO WHAT YOU DO. This is all possible on LinkedIn, but you have to work it, and make it work for you.

I wish you a happy prosperous and healthy new year. 

For part one, click here.

For part two, click here.

Today's LinkedIn Nugget

Top 15 resolutions to make LinkedIn work even better for you in 2015! Part 2 of 3

2015

6. Resolve now to beef up your LinkedIn company profile page–make it show off your products/services. Encourage followers on your company profile page and give them something to follow you for-great material and news!

7. Resolve to use Showcase Pages on the company profile page to call extra attention to products/services/events you want to strategically highlight. Think: free spot advertising.

8. Resolve now to connect your blog, about.me, website, twitter to your LinkedIn personal and company profiles-make it easy to get a hold of you, using different media, by different audiences.

9. Resolve to expand the Volunteer and Causes section on your personal profile; show how you give back to your community and that you make a difference as part of your professional identity. Signal if you want to serve on a board or add pro bono services in your area of expertise.

10.Resolve to take advantage of long-form Posts on LinkedIn, just like a blog and grow your following with intelligent observations and perceptions everyone can relate to and learn from. Everyone can do now write them and they are a year-round present that benefits us all.

Tomorrow: 5 more resolutions to make LinkedIn work even better for you in 2015!

For part one, click here.

Today's LinkedIn Nugget

Top 15 resolutions to make LinkedIn work even better for you in 2015! Part 1 of 3

  1. 2015Resolve now to improve your entire LinkedIn profile to tell WHY you do what you do and also, HOW you do what you do. Overcome the inbred fear of talking about yourself: resolve to show your values you can and give back the best you can, all possible when you know how to best use the tools on LinkedIn.
  2. Resolve now to make personalized LinkedIn connection requests: remind the addressee where you met and tell how you can help them. Just like real life: engage the person, rather than hit-and-run. Never send a boilerplate intro-EVER.
  3. When was the last time you changed your headshot? Resolve to find a great professional photographer to make you look as good as the brand you represent. Your photo follows you all over LinkedIn so make it show you as approachable and vibrant.
  4. Resolve now to add video and Slideshare presentations to your LinkedIn personal profile-in your Summary and Experience sections. Easy and very memorable; think of it like a TV ad for your brand.
  5. Resolve to use key word strategies–get found in searches to get the best from LinkedIn. It’s a huge search engine, you know! And use the advanced search function for best results.

Tomorrow: 5 more resolutions to make LinkedIn work even better for you in 2015!

Today's LinkedIn Nugget

Downward pointing arrows on #LinkedIn-part 12

This week we continue to go over the downward pointing arrows only you see on your profile page. This is the final installment.

profilesdownwardarrowThese functions are all too well hidden, IMHO, unless you know where to find them, yet these 6 functions can be used effectively.

Unfortunately the downward-pointing arrow on your profile is completely hidden behind the dropdown table and would normally be seen to the right of the edit button. You’ll see it when you go to your profile. When you click that downward-pointing arrow, you get these choices. Let’s take one at a time this week, day-by-day.

I will skip Share Profile and Save to PDF, which I covered earlier in last week’s blog postings of  December 15 and 16.

Manage Public Profile Settings

Rempublicprofilesettingsember you have 2 personal profiles on LinkedIn: your public profile and your private.

Public with everyone who happens to click on your profile; private to those you have agreed to connect with.

We are speaking about the public one here.

You can, or can decide to cherry-pick, all or some of the items on your public profile from the box to the left.

My philosophy is that I have little to hide on the public profile as much about me is already on the internet, by design.

I do run into people who are sensitive about past positions or education and they consciously leave this information off their public profile. That’s their particular choice. Just so you know you can pick and choose, that’s my aim.

Word to the wise: don’t be so paranoid as to eliminate too many options int his box, then you will look like you are hiding something or too restricted and in our attention-deficit world, the reader skips over you and goes on to the competitor. Think carefully about the choices you have.

Ok. That’s 12 places you may not have ever known existed on LinkedIn. Power on. Use it well.

Today's LinkedIn Nugget

Downward pointing arrows on #LinkedIn-part 11

This week we continue to go over the downward pointing arrows only you see on your profile page.

profilesdownwardarrowThese functions are all too well hidden, IMHO, unless you know where to find them, yet these 6 functions can be used effectively.

Unfortunately the downward-pointing arrow on your profile is completely hidden behind the dropdown table and would normally be seen to the right of the edit button. You’ll see it when you go to your profile. When you click that downward-pointing arrow, you get these choices. Let’s take one at a time this week, day-by-day.

Create profile in another language
Halt! Arretez! Pare! Hold on.

Not quite.

That should say “Create HEADLINE in another language.” Not your entire profile.

Click here to start the process to have a machine-translated version of your LinkedIn headline made in any of 45+ languages.

I wish I had this when I was in large corporate America and travelled all over!

Final installment is coming on 12/26. Have a great holiday.

 

Today's LinkedIn Nugget

Downward-pointing arrows on #LinkedIn-part 10

This week we continue to go over the downward pointing arrows only you see on your profile page.

profilesdownwardarrowThese functions are all too well hidden, IMHO, unless you know where to find them, yet these 6 functions can be used effectively.

Unfortunately the downward-pointing arrow on your profile is completely hidden behind the dropdown table and would normally be seen to the right of the edit button. You’ll see it when you go to your profile. When you click that downward-pointing arrow, you get these choices. Let’s take one at a time this week, day-by-day.

Ask to be recommended

There are two places to ask someone to recommend you (on their profile as was discussed earlier on this blog December 11th) and here, on your profile. They both work the same way.

It’s a bit counterintuitive to me to ask someone to recommend you by starting the process from your profile page. I would think you would start at theirs.But I guess this is better than the old, convoluted way to get to the recommendations on the previous version of LinkedIn. I am sure glad they fixed that.

Today's LinkedIn Nugget

Downward pointing arrows on #LinkedIn-part 9

Last week we covered the downward pointing arrows on your connection’s profile page.

This week we will go over the downward pointing arrows only you see on your profile page.

profilesdownwardarrowThese functions are all too well hidden, IMHO, unless you know where to find them, yet these 6 functions can be used effectively.

Unfortunately the downward-pointing arrow on your profile is completely hidden behind the dropdown table and would normally be seen to the right of the edit button. You’ll see it when you go to your profile. When you click that downward-pointing arrow, you get these choices. Let’s take one at a time this week, day-by-day.

View recent activity

RecentactivityAre you actively posting articles you like and want to distribute to your connections? Have you congratulated a colleague on a work anniversary? “Liked: their work? Followed a company profile page?

These are kept and counted as Recent Activity (see top of page just below my picture).

Do you post blog-like observations and essays on LinkedIn? These are kept and counted as Posts *same place as Recent Activity).

This page is where you find the most recent material you have contributed in these various (and other) ways. It’s like a historical index of your work, most recent first. So if you have something you want to share with an individual that you already shared with your connections at a previous time, you can easily go back and find it and share it again. Or comment on it.

You can also “like” a comment that someone else made on one of your updates here too.

Use this to categorize and revisit your work.

Tomorrow: Ask to be recommended

 

 

Today's LinkedIn Nugget

Review of downward pointing arrows

We have covered the downward pointing arrows on your connection’s profile page.

downarrow_LinkedInThese functions are all too well hidden, IMHO, unless you know where to find them, yet these 8 functions can be used effectively.

Don’t be afraid to use them, but use them wisely.

Breathe. Think about these.I hope this has been helpful.

Next week we will go over the downward pointing arrows only you see on your profile page. More coming Christmas week.

Happy holidays.

Today's LinkedIn Nugget

Downward pointing arrows on #LinkedIn-part 8

Note: You may not have noticed, but LinkedIn is changing the way you do things.

The “good stuff,” as I like to call it, is getting harder to find, but I will show you where to look in the next few blog posts.

downarrow_LinkedInRight next to the “send a message” bar on any connection’s personal profile page, you will see an adjacent button with a downward pointing arrow.

Click that and a dropdown box with some powerful functionality appears.

All this week, I will review them one by  go one by one to make you more comfortable using these shortcuts:

Remove connection:

Relations change.

You connect with people with good intentions and they do not pan out. Or you made an error and should never have connected in the first place. Or they become a competitor in some way. And finally, they let you down and it’s time to move away from them.

I always suggest you cull through your connections as each of them have access to your entire profile and your own connections and that’s not advisable some times. So be critical and careful in who you remain connected with.

So use “Remove connections” and sever.  They will NOT receive any outright notification from LinkedIn of the action you took.

They WILL see “2nd” next to your name the next time they see your profile, showing that the 1st level connection has been released.

You can always add them back…

Today's LinkedIn Nugget

Downward pointing arrows on #LinkedIn-part 7

Note: You may not have noticed, but LinkedIn is changing the way you do things.

The “good stuff,” as I like to call it, is getting harder to find, but I will show you where to look in the next few blog posts.

downarrow_LinkedInRight next to the “send a message” bar on any connection’s personal profile page, you will see an adjacent button with a downward pointing arrow.

Click that and a dropdown box with some powerful functionality appears.

All this week, I will review them one by  go one by one to make you more comfortable using these shortcuts:

Block or report:

I don’t know about you but I am seeing an increase in spam messages to me on LinkedIn. Some are enticing and I subscribe to the “if it’s too good to be true it must be” philosophy. So I resist, especially when they come out of the blue with no reference point of how we are connected or through whom or what group.

Some are downright funny. Yesterday, again, I received an offer to join an amazing LinkedIn group of Trainers (as in gym trainers) not LinkedIn trainers. I will be happy to train gym trainers but I will block them if I receive one more offer to join the group: “3 strikes and you are out.”

And finally, although I have not had to do this, you can report offenders to the LinkedIn “police” for action.